Category Archives: professional photographers

Ahu Tongariki Overlooking the Milky Way

Ahu Tongariki Over Looking the Milky Way
Ahu Tongariki Overlooking the Milky Way
Easter Island, Chile

Due to the remote location of Easter Island, it has some of the darkest skies you will see anywhere, but these skies are just as elusive as they are brilliant. Being a small island in the heart of the Pacific there is a constant influx of clouds that unpredictably roll in and out at a moments notice. Over the course of the entire week that I spent here, I had one opportunity to capture the Milky Way and only about a two hour window to make it happen. I chose the epic ceremonial site of Ahu Tongariki which boast the largest of Moai to be transported across the island. With15 Maoi standing strong, they were the perfect silhouette to this blanket of stars accented by the quarry site of Rano Raraku peaking out in the distance.

In order to capture the Milky Way in this manner I had to read a few books by some professional photographers to learn the unorthodox camera settings that I almost never use. For those of you looking to get into this kind of shooting Nightscape by David Kingham is a good place to start.

Moai at Rano Raraku

Moai at Rano Raraku
Moai at Rano Raraku
Easter Island, Chile

As one of the most remote and mysterious places on the planet, Easter Island has always been on my radar for places to photograph. I had the opportunity to travel here last July and spent a week studying and capturing the Moai at all hours of the day, and night.

Rano Raraku in Rapa Nui National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage site is a hot bed for Moai sightings, as there are literally hundreds of them scattered about the hillside in various stages of both construction and burial. Rano Raraku is an extinct volcano where the Moai are quarried, carved and dispersed throughout the island. The Moai featured here embedded in the hillside are said to have been in transport before the Moai culture was abanondoned. Centuries of erosion from the peak of the volcano has buried 20 to sometimes 40 feet of these statues into the ground. Excavations have revealed that these Monoliths are even more massive than they seem.

As a professional photographer I have picked up a few tricks on how to capture movement in a still photograph. Utilizing a 10 stop neutral density filter I was able to slow down time to a 90 second exposure in the middle of the day to give the effect of moving clouds.

Advertising Photography for Michael Dawkins Home – NYC Showroom

Advertising photography MD Home NYC Showroom
Advertising photography for Michael Dawkins home. ©2014 professional photographer Craig Denis
Interior photography MD Home NYC Showroom
Interior photography for Michael Dawkins home. ©2014 professional photographer Craig Denis
Product photography MD Home NYC Showroom
Product photography for Michael Dawkins home. ©2014 professional photographer Craig Denis
Interior photography MD Home NYC Showroom
Interior photography for Michael Dawkins home. ©2014 professional photographer Craig Denis
Product photography MD Home NYC Showroom
Product photography for Michael Dawkins home. ©2014 professional photographer Craig Denis
Advertising photography MD Home NYC Showroom
Advertising photography for Michael Dawkins home. ©2014 professional photographer Craig Denis
Interior photography MD Home NYC Showroom
Interior photography for Michael Dawkins home. ©2014 professional photographer Craig Denis
Arhitectural photography MD Home NYC Showroom
architectural photography for Michael Dawkins home. ©2014 professional photographer Craig Denis
Professional photography MD Home NYC Showroom
Professional photography for Michael Dawkins home. ©2014 professional photographer Craig Denis
Interior photography MD Home NYC Showroom
Interior photography for Michael Dawkins home. ©2014 professional photographer Craig Denis
Advertising photography MD Home NYC Showroom
Advertising photography for Michael Dawkins home. ©2014 professional photographer Craig Denis

Interior Designer Michael Dawkins recently launched the opening of his huge New York City showroom and as his go to professional advertising photographer, he had us fly in from Miami to photograph it. With it he brings his contemporary vision for high-end furniture, accessories and product design to The Big Apple. For this shoot we focused on shooting a lot of details and vignettes for Michael’s advertising campaigns. With some key dramatic lighting accents and shot angles we got some strong, edgy material for him to use. The distinct architectural lines in his showroom, as well as his custom black laquered flooring made an interesting setting for his unique furniture pieces to be photographed in.

Although Craig Denis is a professional photographer based in Miami, he travels anywhere for a photographic project. Visit his official website www.craigdenis.com to learn more.

Artefacto – Grove at Grand Bay

Artefacto Showroom for the Grove at Grand Bay
Artefacto Showroom “Before”
©2013 Professional Photographer Craig Denis
Artefacto Showroom for the Grove at Grand Bay
Artefacto Showroom “After”
©2013 Professional Photographer Craig Denis

In this beast of a post production project for Artefacto I was once again asked to make miracles happen to turn this showroom model unit for the soon to be Grove at Grand Bay in Coconut Grove, Miami into what looks like a penthouse apartment sitting room. In the before and after images above you can see that the room I was dealing with presented many challenges. As many commercial photographers know, preconception of the final image in post production had to be thought about while the shoot was happening. The view from the before image features a row of fake floor to ceiling windows with a printed picture of what the view will be. Artefacto’s creative team provided me with the original photos taken to print the window view, I then had to free transform and perspective control those files to fit exactly over the printed windows. Strategic professional photography lighting was set on location to bring the After image to life and further color balance was required in photoshop to give the room a daylight look to match the dropped in view from the outside. The final image is going to be used for Artefacto’s advertising campaign for this location and will be featured as a double page spread in Ocean Drive  Magazine and Florida Design

Check out my previous “Before and After” post to see a little video I put together for more before and after architectural photography samples.

 

Architectural Photography Before and After

 

 

(to view in HD change to 720p on the settings icon on the bottom right of the video screen)

Professional Photographer Craig Denis sheds some light on a few images from his Interior and Architectural Photography archive. The before and after images in the above videos demonstrate what great lighting can do to enhance a photograph. These images have made for great advertising photography campaigns for his commercial clients.

Craig is currently based in Miami, Florida but is willing to travel anywhere for a photo shoot.

 

AIMCO – Architectural Photography of the Yacht Club at Brickell

Yacht Club at Brickell, architectural photography by Craig Denis
©2013 Architectural Photographer Craig Denis
Yacht Club at Brickell_exterior sign_06
©2013 Architectural Photographer Craig Denis
Yacht Club at Brickell, architectural photography by Craig Denis
©2013 Architectural Photographer Craig Denis

Yacht Club at Brickell is an AIMCO run property down in the high-end Brickell area of Miami. Set against a backdrop of Biscayne Bay it offers fantastic views of both downtown as well as the Bay and Atlantic Ocean. After shooting some environmental portraits for AIMCO at the Flamingo on South Beach, they contacted me to shoot some architectural photography of the facade of the Yacht Club both at twilight and during the day for some new commercial advertising that they are planning to do. When shooting a subject like this it is always important to make the building and surrounding landscaping look as clean as possible and that often means a little extra photoshop time than a professional photographer is willing to spend, but when the end result is as clean as these images look it is well worth the extra effort.

BG Studio – Celebrity Reflection

BG Studio - Celebrity Reflection, Interior Photography by Craig Denis
©2013 Professional Interior Photographer Craig Denis
BG Studio - Celebrity Reflection, Interior Photography by Craig Denis
©2013 Professional Interior Photographer Craig Denis
BG Studio - Celebrity Reflection, Interior Photography by Craig Denis
©2013 Professional Interior Photographer Craig Denis
BG Studio - Celebrity Reflection, Interior Photography by Craig Denis
©2013 Professional Interior Photographer Craig Denis
BG Studio - Celebrity Reflection, Interior Photography by Craig Denis
©2013 Professional Interior Photographer Craig Denis
BG Studio - Celebrity Reflection, Interior Photography by Craig Denis
©2013 Professional Interior Photographer Craig Denis
BG Studio - Celebrity Reflection, Interior Photography by Craig Denis
©2013 Professional Interior Photographer Craig Denis
BG Studio - Celebrity Reflection, Interior Photography by Craig Denis
©2013 Professional Interior Photographer Craig Denis
BG Studio - Celebrity Reflection, Interior Photography by Craig Denis
©2013 Professional Interior Photographer Craig Denis
BG Studio - Celebrity Reflection, Interior Photography by Craig Denis
©2013 Professional Interior Photographer Craig Denis

When I was approached by BG Studio International, interior designers from New York City to shoot another commercial photography project I was excited to hear that this would be the 3rd cruise ship that they helped design. They already had won awards for this project from just their design renderings alone and they were eagerly awaiting these images for a publication. We only had a limited time to complete a pretty vast shot list aboard Celebrity’s newest ship the Reflection and many challenges came with this project. The beautiful Reflection Suite was among the most challenging with it’s massive wall of windows overlooking the stern of the ship. The room was completely in silhouette and needed to be brought out with strategic strobe lighting to balance the interior with the view from outside, a technique that many interior photographers have had to master.

Professional Photography Standard for Copyright & Image Licensing

After another run in with a client last week regarding the all mighty copyright beast, the not so fun side of being a professional photographer has once again come out. This time in the form of a work made for hire situation, which many of you already know is a deal breaker for me. I have decided to create a FAQ page on my blog and this post is pretty much a mirror of that from following statements and questions below that were taken directly off the ASMP website and are meant to help educate potential clients and emerging photographers on the industry standard in which professional photographers work.

Most, if not all potential clients have heard of copyright. How much they know about copyright law and how they feel about it will vary dramatically. Some are strong supporters of artists’ rights. Others believe that copyright law has gone too far and feel the use of creative works should be more open and democratic. Still others will be focused on, and bothered by, the idea that you can re-license images originally created for them. Finally, another fraction will simply be unfamiliar with the business of licensing photography altogether.

Below are typical questions that commercial photographers get when approached by new clients:

Q – Client: “Why isn’t your price simply time and materials?”
or
“What is your day rate?”

A – Commercial Photographers: I do not charge on a day rate or hourly basis. Each project is unique, and time is only one factor I consider when determining my price for a specific assignment. Photography is a creative process and production time is rarely an indicator of value.

Q – Client: “Why do you need to know how I am going to use the photographs?”

A – Professional Photographers: Photographs are intellectual property, and licensing their use is how I generate income. The fees for a specific project are based on the use of the photographs because the more the images are used, the greater value they have. Since they’re worth more, they cost more.

Q – Client: “You cost more per hour than my attorney, why should I pay that?”

A – Commercial Photographers: I do not charge by the hour, so dividing the total cost for this project by the hours estimated for me to be on site photographing does not give you a clear explanation of my fees. My fees are based on the creative and production needs of the job, the expenses, and the license terms we agree upon for use of the images. Factors other than time are frequently more influential in determining my price for a job.

Q – Client: “You mean I pay you to take the pictures and I don’t own them?”

A – Professional Photographers: Photographs are the intellectual property of the creator. Much like software or a book, you can purchase the use, but the creator still owns the material. I own the rights to my photographs, but I can write a license that will let you do whatever you need to do. My price will reflect the value of that license.

Q – Client: “I do not want to come back to you each time I need to use these pictures.”

A – Commercial Photographers: I am more than happy to license a package of rights for these photographs, but you may be paying for uses you do not really need. I am service oriented and accessible if additional uses arise. My goal is, of course, to build a long-term business relationship, so tell me what your plans are and we can work out an equitable license.

Q – Client: “I do not want someone else using my images.”

A – Professional Photographers: I am happy to provide you a price for exclusive use of these images, but because this type of license prohibits me from generating any additional income, it will significantly increase the cost of the project. I suggest we compromise and extend you a limited exclusivity — say, six months. This gives you premiere use of the images, but it doesn’t restrict my ability to earn additional income forever.

*ASMP is a great resource for professional photographers to gain and share knowledge on the business of photography.